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Haydn Millard
 
1 October 2017 | Haydn Millard

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1. Smelling the cork. 

We’ve all see it in movies and most of us have been there: you’ve studied the wine list, made a selection and then ordered your bottle of choice. The waiter arrives, bottle in hand and pulls the cork. He then passes it to you. What do you do? For one thing,
you don’t smell it. The tradition of presenting the cork originated in Bordeaux where historically disreputable merchants would sell wines with counterfeit labels of some of the more highly prized chateaus. To protect their reputations and their profits the
chateaus began to inscribe their corks with symbols and words. The waiter presenting you a cork is a homage to this period when upon purchasing a bottle a customer would be presented with the freshly pulled cork in order to check the inscription.

2. Older wine is better wine.

I was recently asked to help my grandfather with the sort of job that I enjoy. He asked me to go through his wine selection and help him to find which wines were of value and which should be consumed now or aged a little longer. No, no one likes to deliver
bad news and this situation was no different. Many of the wines had simply been aged too long. While most wines will improve with age not all do. Up to a certain point wines will develop complexity and become softer on the palate however after too long
they will begin to lose flavour and the subtle nuances that make them wonderful. As a rule of thumb, young wines will be fruity and vibrant while older wines are more savoury, earthy and smooth. If in doubt it’s always a great idea to ask the producer
how long their wines should be kept.

3. The importance of wine legs

“Check out those legs.” That’s one statement that sounds a little forward until you turn around to see everyone staring at the wine glass which is held up. While the perfectly straight and cohesive streaks running down the inside of the glass certainly
look pretty they aren’t indicative of wine quality. This in known as the marangoni effect and is simply a function of the viscosity of the wine and the smoothness of the glass. What wine legs tell us is either that a wine has a higher than normal alcohol
level, a higher level of sweetness, or a little of both.

4. Allowing your wine to breathe

Have you ever been at a dinner party and someone opens the wine, leaving it on the table to “breathe”. The stark reality is that many wines, particularly full bodied reds and whites as well as aged wines will seem more aromatic and flavoursome after
being exposed to a little air. The bad news is that simply opening the bottle and letting it stand wont put enough oxygen in contact with the wine to have a real benefit. Instead, try pouring the wine into your glass and standing it for a few minutes before
drinking.

5. There is a right and a wrong way to enjoy wine

Possibly the greatest myth surrounding wine is that there is a right and a wrong way to drink it. Whether you like strawberries in your Champagne, ice in your Sauvignon Blanc, your Shiraz served as a sangria or your Muscat on ice cream, you’ve never
wrong. After all, wine is made to be enjoyed and while there are guidelines to enjoy it as the winemaker intended it is far more important to form pleasant memories of a wonderful time with great friends and your wine as you like it.

Time Posted: 01/10/2017 at 3:45 PM
Haydn Millard
 
8 September 2017 | Haydn Millard

Wine and Chocolate Pairng

When you think of wine pairing, what comes to mind? While I’m a sucker for a cheese board with quince and honeycombe (and a few glasses of wine of course!), there is something to be said for indulging the guilty pleasure of chocolate while enjoying your favourite drop. Why not finish your next dinner party with a wine and chocolate pairing?

Because of the sweetness of chocolate, it can be tricky to match it to a glass of wine but here are a few combinations that I have found particularly appealing.

Morning Star – Temper Temper White Coconut Rough

Because of the acidity of dry white wines, the contrast to the sugariness of chocolate, and white chocolate in particular can make the wine taste sour. To overcome this try a rose or light red like our Morning Star. The soft texture pairs beautifully with the
richness of the chocolate while the sweetness is beautifully paired to the fragrant strawberries and cream aromas of the wine. I recommend the white coconut rough from Temper Temper as the coconut really adds another dimension to this decadent
experience.

Fimiston – Bahen and Co sea salt and almond.

The Fimiston Reserve Shiraz is a rich, luscious and velvety wine. There is warm, savoury spice on the nose and pungent blueberry on the palate. Try matching this with a dark chocolate such as the Bahen and Co dark chocolate with sea salt and almond. Sip the wine, nibble the chocolate and then sip the wine again. This slightly bitter, less sweet chocolate will reveal layers of flavour in the dark, broody wine that you may not have otherwise noticed.

Perseverance – Gabriel 85% Cocoa

For those of you who enjoy dark chocolate, you know that once the cocoa level gets this high it’s serious business. It’s no longer a sweet treat or for the faint of heart. The chocolate is more like a strong espresso, bitter but complex. Such a serious chocolate
deserves a serious wine. The Perseverance Reserve Cabernet Merlot is just such a wine. Cedary, earthy aromatic notes introduce you to a wine which is a delicate balancing act of rich fruit, dry tannin and subtle oak. The powdery, texture of the chocolate will pair wonderfully with the chalky tannin in the wine.

There you have it. Three Margaret River wines matched with three South West chocolates. Try making up a platter with dried muscatels or figs and some unsalted nuts to really finish the experience.

Time Posted: 08/09/2017 at 3:28 PM
Haydn Millard
 
1 September 2017 | Haydn Millard

Spring in Margaret River

The South West winter is always cold and wet and as such Spring is always a warm and welcome relief. Wildflowers begin to appear on roadsides, in the forests and on the green grazing pastures where we see lambs and calves begin to take their first shaky steps. The days become longer and warmer and the beach becomes inviting once more.

Meanwhile, in the vineyard the vines begin to wake up from their annual dormancy with green shoots reaching for the sun. Tiny clusters of flowers form, which will in time become bunches of grapes from which we make our wine. Bees busily collect nectar, pollinating the vines as they do. It’s an exciting time, it’s the beginning of another vintage.

During spring I am most often spending my days walking the rows of the vineyard,adjusting trellising and thinning shoots from the vines. This lets the canopy stand upright, capturing the sun to ripen the grapes while allowing the dry wind to blow through the vines keeping them healthy. This begins in October when the new season’s shoots are only about 30cm tall however by December when the growing is done and the trellis is set, the vines stretch well above head height. At this stage there are no more flowers, only small bunches of grapes slowly ripening day after day.

The weather changes dramatically in this time too. At the beginning of spring the mornings are cold and the vineyard is wet with dew or even the occasional frost. The days are often windy and cool but the sun is warm. By the time summer rolls around and the grass begins to dry out the days are hot and the shade of the taller vines is certainly welcome.

While all this is happening in the vineyard there is no shortage of work to be done indoors. During Spring Nathan and I prepare our wines from the previous year to be bottled and in November the whole Brown Hill team is together busily bottling our wines, carefully prepared and packaged and ready to be sent out into the world.

All in all Spring is a great time. It’s a time of new beginnings as well as of a time of finishing tasks begun long before. All the while it is a time to be surrounded with the sort of beauty that Margaret River offers which nowhere else in the world can match.

Time Posted: 01/09/2017 at 3:39 PM
Haydn Millard
 
24 August 2017 | Haydn Millard

Margaret River: Then to Now

I cant count the number of times that I have been asked how long Margaret River has been established as a wine region. Ours is a short story but one of great success. 

It began in 1961. Dr John Gladstones was an agronomist with some specialty in geology and a family background in the Swan Valley. It was in 1961 that his thorough research and analysis culminated in the publishing of a paper in which he writes, "As far as the writer is aware, the Busselton-Margaret River region has never been seriously proposed as suitable for commercial viticulture. Nevertheless, a study of its climate shows that it definitely warrants consideration." Jump forward to 1967 and the first vines are planted by cardiologist Dr Tom Cullity on the site which will become Vasse Felix. Rumour is that this land was originally purchased for only $75 per acre.

Now, 50 years on, its hard to imagine Margaret River without the vineyards. In such a (relatively) short time this little town has become known around the globe. I have had conversations with the locals in the south of France who only know two cities in Australia: Sydney and Melbourne, but they know Margaret River. In under 50 years we have gone from cattle pastures and timber logging to a wine region and tourist destination with over 120 cellar doors, world renowned beaches and fully half a million visitors every year.

Still, that leaves us as a young wine region compared to others in the country which have been producing wines for hundreds of years or some around the world which have been doing it for thousands of years. Why should we have such a claim to fame? For me it comes down to this: Margaret River exists because of the great potential that was identified all those years ago by Dr Cullity. Many places grow grapes because the settlers in that place came from old world wine regions. We do so here because our soil, our weather and passion can make truly excellent wines. 

Time Posted: 24/08/2017 at 3:24 PM
Nathan Bailey
 
7 August 2017 | Nathan Bailey

All about Malbec

Purple, inky and thick-skinned – sounds like a description of a deep-sea monster, right? Wrong. These descriptors illustrate the characteristics of magical Malbec, the grape variety with big, bold flavours that’s fast losing its reputation as a blending back-up and quickly gaining traction as a single varietal wine in Australia, Chile, California and Argentina, where its reputation as the “national variety” is reflected in its status as the most widely planted red grape in the country. Malbec is Argentina’s version of Australia’s Shiraz.

Before Malbec grew to stand on its own, this variety was labelled the underdog from its early days in France’s Burgundy. Word has it that its French name is derived from the term “mal bouche”, which means “bad mouth” – possibly a reference to the opinion held by traditional winemakers of the time.

Employed as a blending variety by the French for hundreds of years, Malbec remains one of the six grape varieties allowed in the blend of red Bordeaux wine and is now predominantly planted in Cahors in South West France, where AOC regulations require Malbec comprise at least 70% of the blend with Merlot and Tannat rounding out the outstanding percentage.

From France, it scooted across the Atlantic to Argentina in the late 1800s with French agricultural engineer Michel Pouget. Its plantings now equate to more than 30,000 hectares in this country alone, with vineyards in Mendoza representing the main component. Argentina’s total Malbec vineyards represent 75% of the world’s plantings of this variety.

For years Malbec was considered a “workhorse” grape for Argentinian wine producers, made into affordable everyday drinking wines. But since Argentinian winemakers began to give this difficult-to-grow variety a little love and attention, especially with advancements in modern winemaking technology, Malbec has grown to be crafted into lovely premium wines that are exported all over the world.

So what’s Argentinian Malbec like? Let’s ask respected wine critic Jancis Robinson. She says,“Good Argentine malbec is deeply coloured, spicily rich with an exuberant juiciness and has a trademark almost velvety texture. It’s not difficult to like.”

As well as Argentina, Malbec is planted in many countries, including France, the US, New Zealand, South Africa and Australia, where our plantings have slightly increased since it was introduced in the 19th century. Australia’s  original Malbec clones were of poor quality, so newer clones have been introduced in the late 20th century and to this day, new plantings are springing up in regions all over the country, predominantly in Clare Valley, Heathcote, Barossa Valley, Frankland River, Langhorne Creek, and Margaret River, where Brown Hill’s Oroya Malbec is crafted.

This variety thrives in moderate climates, such as Margaret River and Clare Valley, and boasts a similar palate weight to that of Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon – big, juicy and plush with a robust structure and firm tannins. Its flavours range from red plum and blueberry to vanilla, sweet tobacco and cocoa.

Due to our small plantings and the variety’s challenging growing requirements, Brown Hill’s Reserve Oroya is made in limited quantities and in good vintage years only. Like all our grapes, the Malbec variety is estate grown and hand picked, with hand sorting and ageing in Taransaud French Barriques.

The 2016 Oroya is rich purple in colour, with a savoury, earthy palate, full of cherries, mulberries and plum fruits supported by silky tannins through to its never-ending finish. The best way to purchase this wine is to belong to one of Brown Hill’s wine clubs – our limited release wines are offered first to wine club members before the general public.

So why call this wine the Oroya? All Brown Hill’s wines have a connection to Kalgoorlie in Western Australia, due to the Bailey family’s union with the mining industry. Oroya was a mine endowed with the richest gold deposits of any on the Golden Mile in Kalgoorlie. The Oroya mine’s history is intense and rich – just like Brown Hill’s expression of the Malbec variety.

Best food matches for Malbec meet this variety’s intensity and boldness in their own flavour characteristics – a rare steak sandwich, an Argentinian chorizo hot pot (now there’s a nice meeting of varietal heritage), or even a robust hard cheese would work well.

Find out more about Brown Hill’s Reserve Oroya Malbec right here  – apologies if the wine has sold out. Stay tuned for the next installment of this small-batch wine.

 

 

Time Posted: 07/08/2017 at 9:20 AM
Nathan Bailey
 
22 June 2017 | Nathan Bailey

Brown Hill’s Bill Bailey Shiraz Cabernet

Brown Hill’s Winemaker Nathan Bailey gives a rundown on why the Bill Bailey is his favourite wine to make and how it differs from every other wine across Brown Hill’s ranges.

For a start, I’d like to disclose that the Bill Bailey Shiraz Cabernet is a very special wine, and in fact it is my favourite wine to make. I have a soft spot for the Bill Bailey Shiraz Cabernet as it’s named after my late Uncle Bill to whom I was very close. Uncle Bill was born and bred in Kalgoorlie and worked as an engineer there all his life. A bit like the conditions under which Bill would have worked, the Bill Bailey is a challenging wine to make. 

In the North East of Italy in the Veneto region, vintners follow an ancient formula in which wine is made from drying raisins on straw mats. This wine is known as Amarone. With its higher concentration and alcohol level, silky Amarone is one of Italy’s most distinctive wines. Learn more about this Italian style of wine in this article from Wine Folly.

The Bill Bailey is grown and made in much the same way as this Amarone style. The grapes are picked four to six weeks later than the other varieties, so the berries are mainly raisins. The result is a very ripe, raisiny, full-bodied wine with soft acid and signature characters of big, rich, intense flavours. 

We only make the Bill Bailey in small parcels and we can’t make this wine every year. Why? As it’s is made in the amarone style, where the grapes are left on the vines longer, it isn’t possible to make this wine when we have a late season. Unfortunately we weren’t able to make the Bill Bailey in 2015 or 2017.

Like Brown Hill’s Great Boulder red, which also sits in the Signature range of wines, the Bill Bailey is a non-traditional blend for Margaret River, being a 50/50 mix of Cabernet and Shiraz.

The 2013 vintage won the trophy in Ray Jordan’s West Australian Wine Guide for Best of the West in its category. This wine now has four years of age up its sleeve and has started to settle down. What stands out is the silkiness. The Cabernet adds structure and the Shiraz, along with the Amarone growing style, adds lusciousness. The nose has aromas of black pepper, mulberry jam, juniper, blackberry and a whiff of eucalyptus. The palate tastes of cassis, vanilla, jam and loganberries.

The 2014 is looking just as compelling – try it for yourself. It’s hard to resist drinking it now but it will most certainly age beautifully over the next 10-15 years. I’d really like you to discover firsthand why this is my favourite wine to make.

Brown Hill’s Bill Bailey Shiraz Cabernet

Brown Hill’s Winemaker Nathan Bailey gives a rundown on why the Bill Bailey is his favourite wine to make and how it differs from every other wine across Brown Hill’s ranges.

For a start, I’d like to disclose that the Bill Bailey Shiraz Cabernet is a very special wine, and in fact it is my favourite wine to make. I have a soft spot for the Bill Bailey Shiraz Cabernet as it’s named after my late Uncle Bill to whom I was very close. Uncle Bill was born and bred in Kalgoorlie and worked as an engineer there all his life. A bit like the conditions under which Bill would have worked, the Bill Bailey is a challenging wine to make. 

In the North East of Italy in the Veneto region, vintners follow an ancient formula in which wine is made from drying raisins on straw mats. This wine is known as Amarone. With its higher concentration and alcohol level, silky Amarone is one of Italy’s most distinctive wines. Learn more about this Italian style of wine in this article from Wine Folly.

The Bill Bailey is grown and made in much the same way as this Amarone style. The grapes are picked four to six weeks later than the other varieties, so the berries are mainly raisins. The result is a very ripe, raisiny, full-bodied wine with soft acid and signature characters of big, rich, intense flavours. 

We only make the Bill Bailey in small parcels and we can’t make this wine every year. Why? As it’s is made in the amarone style, where the grapes are left on the vines longer, it isn’t possible to make this wine when we have a late season. Unfortunately we weren’t able to make the Bill Bailey in 2015 or 2017.

Like Brown Hill’s Great Boulder red, which also sits in the Signature range of wines, the Bill Bailey is a non-traditional blend for Margaret River, being a 50/50 mix of Cabernet and Shiraz.

The 2013 vintage won the trophy in Ray Jordan’s West Australian Wine Guide for Best of the West in its category. This wine now has four years of age up its sleeve and has started to settle down. What stands out is the silkiness. The Cabernet adds structure and the Shiraz, along with the Amarone growing style, adds lusciousness. The nose has aromas of black pepper, mulberry jam, juniper, blackberry and a whiff of eucalyptus. The palate tastes of cassis, vanilla, jam and loganberries.

The 2014 is looking just as compelling – try it for yourself. It’s hard to resist drinking it now but it will most certainly age beautifully over the next 10-15 years. I’d really like you to discover firsthand why this is my favourite wine to make.

 

Time Posted: 22/06/2017 at 1:34 PM
Nathan Bailey
 
5 June 2017 | Nathan Bailey

Things to do in Margaret River in Winter

Margaret River’s temperature may have dropped but don’t let that get your winter enthusiasm down – there’s plenty to do right now! Obviously Brown Hill’s cellar door is the perfect winter playtime pursuit, but there are also so many fun activities to keep you and the family busy throughout the cooler months, without having to navigate the peak season crowds. Here are Brown Hill’s top tips for winter fun in Margaret River.

1. Top places to Eat

Eat! Eat! And eat some more! First stop is Margaret River Farmers’ Market every Saturday morning from 8am. Local growers showcase the best of the area’s produce – cheese, fruit, vegies, bread, meat, fish, sweet treats, you name it, it’s at the market.

Chocolate lovers will be in heaven when they step into the Margaret River Chocolate Company’s original factory – it boasts a jaw-dropping range of chocolate products, as well as a café offering visitors light lunches and sweet treats including chocolate fondues, milkshakes, hot drinks, brownies, cakes, cookies, need we go on?

For dinner, there’s nothing quote like fish and chips on the beach in winter time. We often head to The Equinox at the Busselton jetty overlooking Geographe Bay. Grab takeaway and sit under the giant fig trees to watch the sun go down or take advantage of the table service at the restaurant and live it up with a glass of local Margaret River wine.

2.  Climb the lighthouse

Take your trip to new heights by climbing to the top balcony of the Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse. The stunning panoramic views feature the Indian Ocean, the surrounding Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park, the Geographe coastline and the Margaret River region. It’s 13km from Dunsborough and makes a fascinating lesson into the maritime history of the Cape area, with tour guides talking visitors through the working lighthouse, the surrounding cottages and the history of the locale (including a few ghost stories!). If you’ve still got energy after ascending the lighthouse, take one of the walking tracks that lead from the the property to discover more of the local flora and fauna.

3. Cave in

Locals love the fact that our aboveground natural wonders are enhanced by the region’s amazing network of underground caves. Whether it’s Lake Cave, with its spectacular hanging crystal decoration and tranquil lake, or the Jewel Cave in Augusta, home to the longest straw stalactite found in any tourist cave in the world, Margaret River’s caves are a must-see for visitors and locals alike, especially in winter when the crowds are less frantic. Visit this website for more information about the caves, and other natural wonders of the region.

4. Hike or Bike

Margaret River’s walking trails and tracks are world-renowned. From the coastal 140km Cape to Cape Track to scenic bush walks where wild flowers blossom everywhere, there’s a trail or track for every level of walker. And bike lovers beware – whether your pick is mountain biking or road cycling, this region is simply made for wheels. Check out this website for insider tips on the best routes, including coffee pit stops along the way. Visit the Margaret River Region’s Guide for more in-depth information about these activities.

5. Watch the whales

Margaret River’s coastline puts on a show like no other throughout winter and into spring with the epic annual migration of whales from the Southern Ocean to the warmer waters of the Kimberly coast. There’s no better time to see these brilliant beasts of the ocean breach the water and frolic with their friends – for the full rundown on where and when to see these magnificent creatures, read Brown Hill’s Whale Watching blog.

 

 

Time Posted: 05/06/2017 at 4:13 PM
Haydn Millard
 
3 February 2017 | Haydn Millard

Brown Hill 2017 Vintage Update

It’s that time of year again. Green bunches of grapes hang from the vines, nets begin to appear over the vineyard and a sense of a deep breath drawn in and held in anticipation of another coming vintage. The days roll by and there are no longer months but days remaining until we begin harvest and crafting wines for another year. With each day forward a sense of excitement and anticipation grows.

During this time a few things are happening. Maintenance, preparation and vigilance take precedence. We’ve been busy for some time now, checking the vineyard for any repairs that need to be done, and making sure they’re complete. A vineyard is like any farm: there’s never a lack of work to be done. We’re beginning to move indoors, greasing equipment, replacing gaskets and ensuring all the practical considerations are seen to in order to hit the ground running and turn our grapes into the best wine possible.

Above all is the vigilance required to grow a high-quality crop. Nathan and I are walking the rows of vines daily, checking for health and monitoring ripening. Any day now I expect to see the Cabernet turn from green to red. We are always watchful for pests, nutritional deficiencies or damage to the vines. I’m quite pleased to report that every time we take these walks, we’re astounded by how healthy the whole vineyard looks. There’s also the more positive aspect of this monitoring where we attempt to estimate when we will harvest and what yields we should expect.

Summer really is a great time to be in Margaret River. Why not get away for a weekend and come and visit us? From now until the end of April you’re likely to get an insight into winemaking that you’ll rarely be exposed to. As you drive up the driveway you may well see our teams out picking grapes in the morning. In the winery we may be pressing grapes, filling barrels or carefully monitoring fermentation as juice literally becomes wine. 

Time Posted: 03/02/2017 at 5:29 PM
Haydn Millard
 
29 November 2016 | Haydn Millard

Summer in Margaret River

I live in one of the most beautiful parts of the world, something I’m reminded of this time of year. Summer in Margaret River is a truly remarkable time. Long, warm days of cloudless blue skies. Evenings spent outdoors with the cool, sea breeze blowing in. It’s the perfect time to explore all of the natural beauty this unique region has to offer… visits to the beach where the sand is perfectly white, and the water is crystal clear, shaded the most beautiful blue.

Nestled between the coast and some incredible farmland, Margaret River is lucky to have access to amazing produce and indulge in the fresh, local offerings – always best enjoyed over long lunches and summer dinners. Whether it’s fresh seafood, or the local land food of cheeses, meats and fruit, it’s easy to spend hours grazing long into the afternoon with a bottle of wine shared with friends.

Taking a sip and enjoying that glass of wine is well earned for those of us who have dedicated ourselves to the vines all year. Summer is a busy time. It means long days that start before the sun comes up and end long after dark. It means working weekends and holidays, as the grapes are ready when they’re ripe. They wait for no one. It’s a labour of love when the time comes to pick the fruit and begin crafting our wines with the highest of hopes and the best of intentions.

At the end of those long days are the most memorable of evenings spent gathered with those closest to us. Whether it’s around a barbeque or watching the sun set down at the local pub, summer evenings will always be linked to the nostalgia of warm evenings, stories shared with friends and the taste of cold Chardonnay. When it all winds down there is a deep satisfaction of knowing that another day, week or vintage is over and that we worked hard to accomplish something that will bring people enjoyment.

If you’re planning a visit to our neck of the woods, head to Brown Hill’s other blog posts for activities to try, places to eat and stay, or beaches to take a dip in… there’s plenty of information about great things to do. And, don’t forget to drop into our cellar door while you’re in the area too – we’d love to give you a taste of Margaret River and Rosa Brook’s warm hospitality!

Brown Hill’s guide to summer in Margaret River

 

For beach lovers

From Gnarabup to Hamelin Bay, you’ll feel the sun on your face and the sand under your feet at these top beach spots in our region.

READ MORE

 

For foodies

If you’re looking for a delicious meal to complement a glass of your favourite Brown Hill wine, here’s a list of restaurants around Margaret River that serve our drops. Bon appetit!

READ MORE

 

For art lovers

Margaret River is a hub of creativity, so for the art lovers on holiday, there is plenty of choice when it comes to deciding how to spend your day… from art galleries and jewellery studios to collaborative workshops, there’s a creative scene for everyone.

READ MORE

 

Time Posted: 29/11/2016 at 3:40 PM
Nathan Bailey
 
6 September 2016 | Nathan Bailey

Brown Hill Spring Produce

 

Spring fever has hit! One of the benefits of the new season is all the wonderful produce that becomes available from Margaret River. So allow us to introduce you to a few Brown Hill favourites that are on high rotation in our kitchen throughout spring.

Agonis Ridge Organic Lamb

This Rosa Brook organic farm breeds grass-fed beef and lamb that melts in your mouth. The owners also tend lovingly to 1200 olive trees that produce robustly flavoured oil, processed on the farm in a purpose-built facility. The owners of Agonis Ridge, Mike and Bev Pimm, believe they’re the caretakers of their land and treat it with respect so the practices they establish help future generations continue to cultivate high-quality produce in later years.

The Agonis Ridge Wiltipoll lambs have a winter breeding trait, so availability is subject to seasonal variations, but when it becomes available, we make the most of it. If you’re in the area, drop into Margaret River Farmers’ Markets on a Saturday to purchase Agonis lamb for yourself or email agonis@bluemaxx.com.au.  Serve Agonis Ridge Organic Lamb with our Trafalgar Cabernet Merlot.

Koonac Goat’s Cheese

The cheese from this producer comes from a small commercial goat farm in Rosa Brook, and it’s sensational. All the cheeses are hand made on the farm with the milk from its own goats. It’s available at the Margaret River Farmers’ Markets or directly from the farm. From feta and camembert to swiss and haloumi, Koonac’s cheeses are perfect for spring cooking (and eating!). Pair some goat's cheese with our Lakeview Sauvignon Blanc.

Margaret River Free Range Eggs

The eggs that are borne from this farm are so full of flavour. The owners want their hens to be happy hens, so they allow their chooks to exercise and forage on pasture every day. They believe you can taste “the sunshine in our eggs”. And we agree! They’re available all over the Margaret River region, in restaurants and supermarkets, as well at selected outlets in Perth. 

Darnell’s Potatoes

Alan Darnell and his partner Debbie Serventy run a 120-hectare farm that borders Margaret River in Rosa Brook. It’s a lamb and beef farm, with potatoes and corn as well. Alan and Deb can be found selling their lusciously sweet corn and potatoes at the Margaret River Farmers’ Markets every Saturday morning. Alan’s claim to “Rosa Brook fame” is that his father started our local General Store called Darnell’s many years ago, which is still in operation to this day.

Margaret River Smokery & Deli

This local producer smokes its own beef, lamb and pork – and it’s superb. It’s a recent addition to the Margaret River Farmers Markets and it’s one of the first stalls to sell out. Why? The treatment of the stock (all stock is fed on high-quality grass), the attention to detail of the smoking at the butchery and the slow-cooking of the meat all contribute to creating produce with a holistic farm-to-plate approach.

 

Time Posted: 06/09/2016 at 3:22 PM